November 16, 2016

Saydel-Cornell Elementary Addition

This four classroom addition and activity space was the first step in a 10 year master plan for the Saydel Community School District to update existing facilities to accommodate 21st Century Learning and teaching methods.  With a unique identity and color scheme for every classroom, the day-lit spaces are bright and exciting places for instruction. The central activity space serves as an extension of the classroom for collaborative group work or individual projects and reading.  The project also includes an outdoor discovery play area for pre-kindergartners, featuring a playground, tricycle track, nature station, and shade structure, allowing the youngest students to learn through imaginative outdoor play and active discovery.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Kassia Payne. A-AIA

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

 

June 24, 2015

Ames CSD Administration Building

The Ames CSD 24th Street Development is a 26-acre parcel which will be developed to include a new administration building, baseball and softball complex, future tennis courts, a practice cross country course, and supporting buildings, infrastructure and amenities.  It was the desire of the administrative team and the school board to design a building that was sensitive to the built environment of the adjacent neighborhood. The building was placed parallel to the railroad tracks which angles it to the street and appears to open and invite one onto the site.

Keeping the building single story addresses the concern of nearby neighbors wanting a more human scale to the building.  Only the center public portion which is surrounded on three sides by the single story sections, has higher sloped roofs.  Choosing a material palette that reflects materials of the neighborhood maintains a design connection to the adjacent houses and buildings.  Brick is used around the building to the sill height of the windows. Sills are constructed of cast stone, as are the low column surrounds. The columns support the entrance canopy and introduce wood as a building material.  Large wood beams support the center reception space and offer a warm welcoming effect to those that enter. The use of horizontal lap siding and vertical board siding, complement that of the neighborhood houses. Windows, both large and small, offer natural daylight into occupied spaces. Mechanical equipment has been located inside in the mechanical mezzanine.

The athletic support buildings including concessions, restrooms, press boxes, storage, and plaza features, will be constructed from the same material palette as the administration building, thus adding a layer of cohesiveness to the built elements found on the site.  Landscaping on site will be accomplished through the use of earthen berms, trees and shrubs to provide screening, shade and enhancements to the site.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Leila

Leila E. Ammar, AIA – LEED AP BD+C

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

June 14, 2015

Ames CSD Baseball and Softball Complex

The Ames CSD 24th Street Development is a 26-acre parcel which will be developed to include a new administration building, baseball and softball complex, future tennis courts, a practice cross country course, and supporting buildings, infrastructure and amenities.

The athletic support buildings including concessions, restrooms, press boxes, storage, and plaza features, will be constructed from the same material palette as the administration building, thus adding a layer of cohesiveness to the built elements found on the site.  Landscaping on site will be accomplished through the use of earthen berms, trees and shrubs to provide screening, shade and enhancements to the site.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Leila

Leila E. Ammar, AIA – LEED AP BD+C

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

December 18, 2014

Vermeer Applied Technology Hub

The Vermeer Applied Technology Hub, located at the Iowa State Research Park in Ames, Iowa, this facility houses opportunities for innovation and collaboration between Iowa State students and Vermeer team members to develop the next generation of Vermeer equipment.  The Iowa based company intends to create an environment for software engineers to excel in the development of practical, affordable and modular equipment technology. The unique space provides office space to allow students and faculty from Iowa State and other schools to work collaboratively on technology advancements for Vermeer industrial and agricultural equipment. As technology is developed, a specialized high-bay facility is used for testing and validation.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Leila

Leila E. Ammar, AIA – LEED AP BD+C

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

November 17, 2014

Saydel High School Renovations

The Saydel Community School District had a vision to refresh its high school weight room and practice gymnasium; centered around the ideas of activity and wellness.  Funded by a bond referendum, this renovation of their existing high school wellness facilities, administrative offices, and primary high school entry is the realization of that vision.

Wellness Components | The District desired to make wellness integral with their school curriculum and culture. Existing space limitations initially posed a challenge, leading members of the board and administration to assume that a costly addition would be necessary to house an expanded weight training and new cardiovascular training areas.  A space utilization analysis revealed that underutilized spaces in the existing high school administrative areas, computer lab, and practice gymnasium could be reorganized and reclaimed to make room for the expanded weight training and new cardiovascular training areas.  This analysis alone not only saved the district thousands of dollars of new construction costs, it also saved on the future heating and cooling costs of the additional square footage.

Entry Improvements | Multiple additions and renovations to Saydel High School over the past several decades had resulted in a strange circumstance, where the set of west doors (originally intended as a secondary entrance) became the primary entrance to the high school. This was not only confusing to visitors of the school as to “where is the front door,” but also presented major security problems as school administrators had no control over the flow of visitors into and out of the building.  The challenge to creating a sense of entry for the high school was working with only a narrow strip between the existing building and the parking lot. The solution was a to create a minimal, yet distinct entry canopy with lit banner flags, signage, and an accent retaining wall with landscaping.  Security was greatly improved by moving the administrative offices to the space directly adjacent to the front entrance (formerly the weight room), punching large windows for vision to the parking lot, and modification to the vestibule doors to funnel visitors through the administrative offices before gaining access to the rest of the building.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer PE

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

March 24, 2014

ISU School of Education

The goal of this renovation to Lagomarcino Hall on the Iowa State University campus was to consolidate and reallocate space, service, and resources to better serve the functions and services of the newly formed Iowa State University School of Education.  Administrative offices and support spaces will be consolidated into a centralized “home” for the School of Education and a new exterior entrance addition, equipped with a handicap accessible elevator, will be built, creating higher visibility for the School as well as providing a common entry for ease of way finding and circulation.  Both formal and informal collaborative and common space for students, faculty, and staff have been incorporated into the design to better serve modern pedagogies of education.  The S.T.E.M. & Literacy classrooms will be centrally located within the complex with support staff located in nearby offices.

The location, size, and character of Lagomarcino Hall establish this building and its courtyards as significant landmarks within the context of the Iowa State University campus.  This renovation of the 1954 International Style north wing of Lagomarcino Hall will update the undesirable “institutional”double loaded corridor building into an environment suitable for the needs of the School of Education administration, faculty, staff, and students.  Designed as a simple, clean, and ‘transparent’ insertion into the existing building fabric, the new entry addition, technology rich interior spaces, and courtyard views will support collaborative interaction between students, staff, and faculty.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Leila

Leila E. Ammar, AIA – LEED AP BD+C

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer, PE

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

May 25, 2011

Saydel Athletic Complex

“I have found HAILA to be responsive to our needs, collaborative in their approach to the design work, and solution focused in all phases of a project.”

-Dr. Brad Buck, Former Supt of Saydel CSD, Current Director of the Iowa Department of Education


Phase I Completed 2010 | Located in an industrial area on the north side of Des Moines, this athletic complex allows the Saydel Community School District to achieve its own identity through the programs that it supports.  The district’s vision for a contemporary athletic facility is indicative of the progressive mentality of the community, and this four structure addition to the high school campus is the realization of that vision.

Phase II Completed 2014 | Funded by a 2013 Bond Referendum | Building on the success of the Phase I development, Phase II provided a football home and visitor bleachers, press box, synthetic turf, track modifications, and site beautification.  The home and visitor bleachers flipped sides to create a better spectator experience for the home side fans and

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer PE

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

May 14, 2010

Woodward-Granger High School

The Woodward-Granger High School addition is the resultant built form of a growing district’s vision to provide modern educational and extra-curricular amenities to students as well as the community.  The multi-level design fits seamlessly within the existing building and dynamic site, providing intuitive circulation flow for both student and public access.  The level changes as well as the material contrast of the existing masonry to the contemporary pre-cast concrete echo the shift from academic to athletic areas.

Project Team

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer PE

sam2

Sam Stagg, AIA

John 1

John Haila, PE

Ballard High School

“One thing [the students] absolutely love is all the glass and natural light that comes into every classroom.  They say it keeps them more alert.  Their attitudes are more cheery, and they love the views.  From almost every room or hallway they have an outdoor view.  Teachers and kids are coming earlier and staying later.  They want to be a part of this.  We used to have to go down the halls and beg kids to be class officers, especially juniors and seniors.  This year we had 35 seniors, 20 juniors, and 15 sophomores sign up to be class officers!  It is unprecedented.”

-John Ronca, Principal of Ballard High School

“We, the facilities committee and board, asked HAILA to produce a school that was forward-thinking, not a box on a 50-acre site.  We wanted it as maintenance free as possible.  They are the ones who brought us the idea of wide hallways, a version of ‘learning streets’ where students can meet in open spaces.  They delivered.”

-John Speer, Superintendent of the Ballard Community School District


Over the last several decades there has been significant flight from small rural Iowa communities to larger urban centers.  These towns, no longer economically sustainable, have been losing business and jobs at a steady or increasing rate, threatening to dissolve the foundations of Iowa’s rural identity.  One such community has found a way to combat the urban flight.  The visionary school board of this small rural school district realized that by investing in their small town schools, they could effectively attract young families in search of small class sizes and excellent facilities to the district.  Over the past two decades the district’s efforts to create excellent places for learning has paid dividends, making it one of the fastest growing rural school districts in the state, ultimately breathing new life into the communities that the district serves.

In light of the Ballard school district’s increased growth, the need for a new high school presented an opportunity to completely reinvent the educational and civic environment of the community.  Presuppositions about how a high school should work and what it should look like were discarded early in the programming phase, allowing the design to evolve and change to meet the needs and vision of the district. Being sited on the edge of town and clearly visible for miles around, it was imperative that the new high school create an iconic image indicative of the progressive mentality of the district.  In striking contrast to the agricultural backdrop, the curtain walled façade of the media center coupled with the red brick and precast concrete walls creates an iconic and distinctly modern architecture in the rural landscape.  Flooded by daylight, the commons serves as a community gathering space for community events as it serves the adjacent auditorium, band/vocal rooms, media center, and gymnasium.

The arrangement of the two wings of classrooms allows for future classroom and athletic additions by maintaining simple circulation patterns and natural way-finding without sacrificing natural daylight.  In addition to providing a means for future growth, several sustainable initiatives were incorporated into the design such as wind turbines which generate up to 50% of the school’s energy, water retentive prairie grass landscaping, high efficiency glazing to provide natural day lighting in 98% of all learning spaces, using local durable materials such as polished concrete floors & concrete block walls, and utilizing efficient HVAC systems.  The sustainable initiatives of the project have instilled a mentality within the school district to make future buildings in Ballard district models for highly sustainable design.

Visionary in approach, the gesture of this high school is a model for sustainable design in rural communities.  Providing magnitude and direction to the market viability of high design outside Iowa’s urban centers, this high school pronounces that progressive architecture has the ability to be a catalyst for renewal in rural communities, providing a means to preserve Iowa’s rural identity for generations to come.


Press

Lawrence, Lance, and Tom Hendrick. “High-Performance Design.” American School & University. American School & University, 1 Oct. 2012. Web. 30 Oct. 2013

“Project Detail:Ballard High School.” Architect Magazine. Architect Magazine, n.d. Web. 30 Oct. 2013.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer, PE

chad2

Chad West, AIA LEED AP

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

November 12, 2009

Ballard Middle School Addition

NEEDS:

  • Larger and more junior high science classrooms for growing school district
  • Flexible spaces to facilitate both lab and lecture functions within the same space
  • Integration of new technologies

CHALLENGES:

  • Twelve week construction timeframe to create junior high labs out of three existing classrooms
  • Additions to fit in within long range planning of the school district
  • Coordinate work and installation of equipment over multiple phases

SOLUTION:

  • Bid project in winter to allow for equipment delivery ready for installation in summer
  • Shared preparation spaces to minimize costs
  • Some equipment and furniture mobile to allow instructors to customize their space

Ballard West Elementary

In light of the school district’s increased growth, the need for six additional kindergarten classrooms and a large group activity space created an opportunity for a fresh new addition to the Ballard West Elementary School in Slater, Iowa.  Clearly visible from the main north-south highway through town, it was imperative that the new addition create an iconic image of the progressive mentality of the district.  The whimsical dancing windows of the commons area, coupled with clerestory windows and classroom wings create a distinct piece of architecture in the rural Iowa setting, while simultaneously referencing the local agrarian material palette.  The commons area links the two banks of classrooms, additional rest rooms, and support spaces while introducing elements of color, natural daylight, and interesting space for group learning & common activities.

The arrangement of the two wings of classrooms and the inclined roof of the common space allow for future classroom additions by maintaining simple circulation patterns and natural way-finding without sacrificing natural daylight within the new commons.  In addition to providing a means to allow a growing school district to build further expansion in the future, several sustainable initiatives were incorporated into the design such as natural day lighting with highly efficient glazing, using local durable materials such as polished concrete floors & concrete block walls, and utilizing efficient HVAC systems.  The sustainable initiatives of the project have instilled a mentality within the school district for future buildings in their district to be models for highly sustainable design.

Roland-Story Multi-Purpose Room

Needs:

  • A middle school requiring a larger space for assemblies, physical education, community events, and athletic competition.

Challenges:

  • Providing a truly multi-purpose facility able to accommodate a wide range of school and community activities.
  • Fitting an addition into an existing school building both programmatically and aesthetically.

Solution:

  • The design utilized a precast concrete and masonry structure which took several design cues from the existing building, including repetition of forms.
  • Materials used to finish the spaces can accommodate many kinds of use and the multi-purpose space can be manipulated to conform to unique uses.
A middle school requiring a larger space for assemblies, physical education, community events, and athletic competition.
October 12, 2009

IVCC Learning Studio Addition

The higher education landscape of the U.S. is changing beneath our feet.  There are over 1,600 community colleges across the country and half of all students who receive a baccalaureate degree attend community college in the course of their undergraduate studies.  Community colleges provide affordable access to education for minorities, low income students, working adults, and first-generation higher education students.

As the institution of high education changes, so too should the architecture.  Traditional university architecture in the Collegiate Gothic style as well as Thomas Jefferson’s classically inspired “Academical Village” represent exclusivity and elitism, while in contrast the architecture of community colleges should reflect the core values of accessibility, flexibility, and attainability in education.

An extension of a decade long conversion of a former grocery store into classroom space, this learning studio addition addresses a growing community college’s need for additional classrooms with an emphasis on flexibility and collaboration in the learning environment.  The college desired to enhance their program offerings and attract potential students through those programs, as well as through the architecture of the new building.

Each learning studio has the ability to transform into countless configurations to allow maximum flexibility in the classroom.  Flexibility was achieved through a grid work of floor electrical boxes, multidirectional projectors, 360 degree writing surfaces, and mobile furniture.  Lighting can be customized through multiple programmable scenes and all instructor equipment can be remotely operated.  The comprehensive assemblage of these flexible components allows instructors to effectively configure each classroom to best suit their individual curriculum and teaching methods; lecture based, group seminar based, and everything in between.

The learning studios, along with faculty offices, form the perimeter of the building creating a central collaborative space which includes private, semi-private, and informal public meeting spaces where students and faculty can study, relax, and work together on group projects.  The evident transparency of the central space increases the probability of spontaneous collaborations as well as increases the exposure of the college’s programs and teaching methods.