Ames CSD 24th Street Development

The Ames CSD 24th Street Development is a 26-acre parcel which will be developed to include a new administration building, baseball and softball complex, future tennis courts, a practice cross country course, and supporting buildings, infrastructure and amenities.  It was the desire of the administrative team and the school board to design a building that was sensitive to the built environment of the adjacent neighborhood. The building was placed parallel to the railroad tracks which angles it to the street and appears to open and invite one onto the site.

Keeping the building single story addresses the concern of nearby neighbors wanting a more human scale to the building.  Only the center public portion which is surrounded on three sides by the single story sections, has higher sloped roofs.  Choosing a material palette that reflects materials of the neighborhood maintains a design connection to the adjacent houses and buildings.  Brick is used around the building to the sill height of the windows. Sills are constructed of cast stone, as are the low column surrounds. The columns support the entrance canopy and introduce wood as a building material.  Large wood beams support the center reception space and offer a warm welcoming effect to those that enter. The use of horizontal lap siding and vertical board siding, complement that of the neighborhood houses. Windows, both large and small, offer natural daylight into occupied spaces. Mechanical equipment has been located inside in the mechanical mezzanine.

The athletic support buildings including concessions, restrooms, press boxes, storage, and plaza features, will be constructed from the same material palette as the administration building, thus adding a layer of cohesiveness to the built elements found on the site.  Landscaping on site will be accomplished through the use of earthen berms, trees and shrubs to provide screening, shade and enhancements to the site.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Leila

Leila E. Ammar, AIA – LEED AP BD+C

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

December 2, 2014

Ames Chamber of Commerce

The Ames Chamber of Commerce had a vision to consolidate their separate offices to a singular location within Ames’s centralized Main Street Cultural District and seized the opportunity to move into this historic two story building. The Chamber also desired to creating an inviting space, open for use by all members and businesses, not just the Chamber staff.

The challenge of the project was to create a cohesive office layout between two levels and respect the historic character of the interior space. The solution was to create a receptionist desk on the main level to direct visitors either to the second level offices or to the first level conference rooms, creating a clear delineating line between public, semi-public, and private spaces.

The modern conference/board room on the main level utilizes a traditional material in white oak casework and accent walls, set in juxtaposition to the contemporary all glass corridor walls. The partial height walls of the board room with its “portal” ceilings expose and celebrate the historic tin ceiling. The overall effect is a modern and contemporary interior design that respects the historic character of the building, reflective of the traditional yet progressive values of the Ames Chamber of Commerce.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Leila

Leila E. Ammar, AIA – LEED AP BD+C

 
John 1

John A. Haila, PE

October 15, 2012

Story County Community Services

The vacated lower level of the Human Services Building presented an opportunity for the growing Story County Community Services Department to capture additional office space as well as reinvision daily operations of staff and visitors.

One of the primary challenges of the project was to provide an access corridor for maintenance staff to be able to walk freely from one end of the long narrow building to the other without disrupting the officing functions of the Community Services staff. Furthermore, any corridor along the perimeter of the space would potentially block the already limited daylight provided by the basement windows. The solution was to provide a continous band of partially obscurred ribbon windows along the main east-west corridor, allowing daylight and relative privacy to the Community Services staff, while allowing maintenance personel to move freely between the two sides of the building.

The department also desired multiple types and scales of conferencing abilities, from large staff meetings of twenty people or more to small personal meetings with visitors of no more than two to three people. Having limited space for conferencing functions, the solution was to create a singular flexible conference space with an operable glass wall to bisect the room on the fly. When openned, the room can easily accomodate a large staff meeting. When closed, the operable glass wall divides the space into two spaces, a medium and small sized conference room. Additionally, private offices were designed to provide impromptu meetings and conferences with visitors as well.

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer PE

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

May 25, 2011

Saydel Athletic Complex

“I have found HAILA to be responsive to our needs, collaborative in their approach to the design work, and solution focused in all phases of a project.”

-Dr. Brad Buck, Former Supt of Saydel CSD, Current Director of the Iowa Department of Education


Phase I Completed 2010 | Located in an industrial area on the north side of Des Moines, this athletic complex allows the Saydel Community School District to achieve its own identity through the programs that it supports.  The district’s vision for a contemporary athletic facility is indicative of the progressive mentality of the community, and this four structure addition to the high school campus is the realization of that vision.

Phase II Completed 2014 | Funded by a 2013 Bond Referendum | Building on the success of the Phase I development, Phase II provided a football home and visitor bleachers, press box, synthetic turf, track modifications, and site beautification.  The home and visitor bleachers flipped sides to create a better spectator experience for the home side fans and

Project Team

sam2

Samuel J. Stagg, AIA

Art Baumgartner

Arthur M. Baumgartner, AIA

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer PE

John 1

John A. Haila, PE

March 17, 2011

Webster County L.E.C.

Webster County Law Enforcement Center Remodeling

Location:  Fort Dodge, Iowa

Completed in three (3) overlapping phases, this extensive remodeling project included not only removal and replacement of sanitary sewer and domestic water systems, but also included: replacement of the building’s masonry veneer; new windows; new lighting; upgraded mechanical systems and DDC; new boilers; interior finishes.

In order to accomplish this work, most building occupants were temporarily moved to another location for the duration of construction. However, one of the project’s greatest challenges was to have the jail floor remain partially occupied during construction. Additionally, the communication center had to remain fully operational during construction, due to the critical nature of the LEC’s operations.

The solution was a multi-phase approach with additional sub-phases to allow migration of staff and prisoners during construction, allowing these critical LEC operations to remain partially or fully functional for the duration of the project.

Phase 1:  $2,769,000

Phase 2:  $    597,000

Phase 3:  $2,940,000

Completed:  April, 2012

Project Team

chad2

Chad West, AIA – LEED AP

Eric Vermeer

Eric Vermeer PE

Art Baumgartner

Art Baumgartner, AIA

John 1

John Haila, PE

May 5, 2010

Webster County Courthouse

From 1983 to today, HAILA Architecture | Structure | Planning has had a hand in many renovation and preservation projects for the historic Webster County Courthouse, located in Fort Dodge, Iowa.

Registered on the National Register of Historic Places since 1981, the 1902 Beaux-Arts Classical Revival Courthouse has had many projects completed over the years incuding complete window replacement, stone masonry cleaning, electrical and mechanical service modernization, and interior renovations. Major interior renovations include the atrium stair case, court rooms, staff offices, and restroom renovations.

One of the greatest challenges for this building was finding local contractors skilled in traditional or historic methods of construction. For example, the plaster crown moldings that ring the interior atrium, critical to the architectural integrity of the space, were restored by a plaster artisan with a technique similar to piping ornate cake frosting details. The end result is an architectural gem, bringing great civic pride to the city and county.

November 12, 2009

Boone Family Resource Center

NEEDS:

  • Create a new child and adult day care center to meet a growing community demand.
  • Design needed to allow for future growth.

CHALLENGES:

  • Required extensive written and graphic communication and paperwork due to the grant process, working with the city nad private donors.

SOLUTIONS:

  • Two separate entrances for adult and child day care, to both drive-up and drop-off areas.
  • Common circulation areas allow for visual and physical inter generational interaction.
  • Building allows for future expansion to the west, integrating future program areas.

Ericson Public Library

NEEDS:

  • Growing library collection and children’s department required doubling the program space
  • Required complete interior and exterior renovation
  • Building listed on National Registry of Historic Places and owner desired to maintain the historical integrity of the building

CHALLENGES:

  • Matching the architecture of the existing building
  • Original structure not adequate to support library floor loads

SOLUTION:

  • Three-story addition of similar geometry and footprint
  • Architectural details and materials were replicated